Welcome to 365 Days of Motoring

An Everyday Journey Through Motoring History, Facts & Trivia

Belt up and enjoy this 365-day ride as you cruise past the most momentous motoring events in history. Packed with fascinating facts about races, motorists and the history of the mighty engine, this is a must-visit web site for any car enthusiast.

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Motoring Firsts


A random selection of firsts from the world of motoring.

Electric Car

Scottish inventor Robert Anderson built the first electric vehicle on record between 1832 and 1839. The car looked like a carriage without a horse in front of it.

Dipstick

The first car with a dipstick to check oil was launched in 1915 – the Morris Cowley. Unlike many automobile inventions this one is still used, unchanged in nearly all cars

Antilock Brakes

In 1968, Ford became the first automaker to offer an antilock brake system. Though the system did not sell in large volume, it did validate the technology and lead to more sophisticated antilock systems. In 1979, Mercedes-Benz introduced the first computerised antilock braking system.

Zebra Crossings

Zebra crossings for pedestrians were first introduced in Britain in October 1951. Although the origin of the name is disputed, it is generally attributed to British M.P. James Callaghan who, in 1948, visited the country's Transport Research Laboratory, which was working, on a new idea for safe pedestrian crossings. On being shown a black and white design, Callaghan is said to have remarked that it resembled a zebra.

Traffic Signs (Britain)

The first traffic signs were erected in Britain in December 1879. They were installed by the Bicycle Union and consisted of a wooden post with an enameled iron plate bearing the warning: “To cyclists – this hill is dangerous”. In 1901 the first signs directed specifically at motorcar drivers were introduced in Gloucester. The first internationally standardized signs (a red triangle surrounding a plate with an agreed symbol) were agreed upon in 1909 in France.

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