Welcome to 365 Days of Motoring

An Everyday Journey Through Motoring History, Facts & Trivia

Belt up and enjoy this 365-day ride as you cruise past the most momentous motoring events in history. Packed with fascinating facts about races, motorists and the history of the mighty engine, this is a must-visit web site for any car enthusiast.

Roads & Motorways


A random selection of interesting facts about the roads and motorways of the world.

Widest Road in the World by Lane Number

Katy Freeway (part of Interstate 10) in Houston, Texas, has a total of 26 lanes in some sections - 12 main lanes, 8 lanes of access roads, and 4-6 mid-freeway HOT/HOV lanes, not counting access road turning lanes.

British Roads

Roads occupy less than 2% of the surface of Great Britain and most roads are local streets and lanes. The motorways and trunk roads in England carry 32% of all traffic whilst taking up a very small surface area.

Two-digit US Interstate Highways

Two-digit US interstate highways are numbered according to direction and location. Highways running north-south are odd numbered, while highways running east-west are even numbered. The lowest numbers are in the west and in the south.

Longest Two-Digit Motorway

The M25 is the longest 2-digit Motorway in GB at approximately 120 miles from Dartford to Thurrock.

Longest Road in Australia

Australia’s longest straight road is the famous “90 Mile Straight.” It runs between Balladonia and Caiguna on the 1,036 mile (1,668 km) long Eyre Highway across the flat, arid Nullarbor Plain. (The Eyre Highway is the main road that connects South Australia with the south of Western Australia.) The “90 Mile Straight” actually is 91 miles (146.6 km) long; all asphalt without a single curve. The Nullarbor Plain hosts the “World’s Longest Golf Course”, the Nullarbor Links. Golfers play holes at various roadhouses and roadside stops along the road. The world’s longest straight section of railway also crosses the Nullarbor Plain, covering a 297 miles (478 km) stretch between the 797 km post west of Ooldea and the 1275 km post west of Loongana on the Trans-Australian Railway from Perth to Sydney via Adelaide.

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