Welcome to 365 Days of Motoring

An Everyday Journey Through Motoring History, Facts & Trivia

Belt up and enjoy this 365-day ride as you cruise past the most momentous motoring events in history. Packed with fascinating facts about races, motorists and the history of the mighty engine, this is a must-visit web site for any car enthusiast.

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On This Day


26th July

1847

174 years ago

Moses G Farmer of Dover, New Hampshire demonstrated his 'electromagnetic locomotive', the ancestor of the electric automobile. Using forty-eight pint cup cells of Grove nitric acid battery he drew a little car carrying two passengers on a track a foot and a half wide

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1858

163 years ago

Peugeot Freres registered its "lion with or without arrows" trademark, a logo widely used in later years on its automobiles.

Peugeot lion logo

Peugeot lion logo

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1903

118 years ago

A Winton driven by Dr Horatio Nelson Jackson and Sewall K. Crocker arrived in New York City after completing the first coast-to-coast crossing of the United States by car, having started from San Francisco on 23 May. More than 20 out of the 63 days were spent making repairs, much of the trouble being caused by the poor roads, but a fracture of the connecting rod, which burst through the crankcase, was responsible for the longest delay. Continue Reading →

Exhibit at the National Museum of American History recreating H. Nelson Jackson first successful North American transcontinental automobile trip in a 1903 Winton touring car, the Vermont.

Exhibit at the National Museum of American History recreating H. Nelson Jackson first successful North American transcontinental automobile trip in a 1903 Winton touring car, the Vermont.

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1908

113 years ago

At 6.15 pm the German car, Protos, driven by Lt Koeppen crossed the Paris finishing line in the race from New York via Alaska and Peking, sponsored by the New York Times, after traveling more than 18,000 miles in 170 days – 88 of which had been on the road and averaged over 150 miles a day (with a maximum of 400 in 24 hours). But the declared winner was American Thomas ‘Flyer’ car after the Protos was penalized for traveling part of the way by train. Continue Reading →

Cars lined up for the start of the New York to Paris road race: De Dion-Bouton (in front), Protos, Motobloc

Cars lined up for the start of the New York to Paris road race: De Dion-Bouton (in front), Protos, Motobloc

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1913

108 years ago

Bob Burman, driving his Blitzen Benz in Vancouver, British Columbia, established a Canadian record for the flying mile of 50.8 seconds in an exhibition sponsored by E B Conner of the Imperial Oil Company, Ltd.

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1916

105 years ago

The Studebaker Series 18 was introduced.

Studebaker Series 18

Studebaker Series 18

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1916

105 years ago

Dave Lewis drove a Crawford to victories in the 5 mile and 50 mile events at Des Moines Speedway in Des Moines, Iowa, US. Frank Galvin won the 10 and 20 mile races in a Sunbeam.

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1921

100 years ago

Jimmy Murphy driving Duesenberg won the French Grand Prix at Le Mans at 78.10 mph, the first major American victory in Europe.

Signals for Sunbeam drivers at the 1921 French Grand Prix.

Signals for Sunbeam drivers at the 1921 French Grand Prix.

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1924

97 years ago

The last South Harting hill climb (now the B2141 road) event was held. The West Sussex (England) venue was one of the most important motor hill climbs in the country during the 1920s, with Frazer Nash, Aston Martin and Raymond Mays (Bugatti) participating. The event was founded by Earl Russell in 1905.

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1925

96 years ago

Antonio Ascari (36) died on the way to the hospital after he crashed his Alfa Romeo P2 during the French Grand Prix at Montlhery. He began racing cars at the top levels in Italy in 1919, using a modified 1914 Fiat. Along with Enzo Ferrari, he raced in the first Targa Florio held after the end of World War I in 1919, but did not finish after crashing into a deep ravine. Continue Reading →

Antonio Ascari

Antonio Ascari

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1926

95 years ago

Ernest C Kanzler resigned from the Ford Motor Company six months to the day after his memo to Henry Ford recommended replacing the Ford Model T.

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1930

91 years ago

Charles Creighton and James Hargis left New York City driving their Ford Model A 1929 roadster 3340 miles in reverse, arriving in Los Angeles 17 days later without once stopping the engine. They arrived back in New York on the 5th September so completing 7,180 miles in 42 days.

Charles Creighton and James Hargis

Charles Creighton and James Hargis

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1932

89 years ago

Creator of the Duesenberg Automobile and Motors Company, Frederick S. Duesenberg (56) died in Johnstown, Pennsylvania, of complications from injuries suffered in a motoring accident on July 2, 1932. Born in Lippe, Germany, Frederick moved to the US in 1885. Continue Reading →

Frederick S. Duesenberg

Frederick S. Duesenberg

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1936

85 years ago

Bernd Rosemeyer driving an Auto Union Typ C won the German Grand Prix at the Nürburgring. Manfred Von Brauchitsch lad on the first lap but was then passed by Rosemeyer and Hermann Lang. Rudolf Caracciola retired early. Continue Reading →

1936 German Grand Prix - Bernd Rosemeyer

1936 German Grand Prix - Bernd Rosemeyer

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1937

84 years ago

Racer Ernst von Delius (25) died from injuries suffered the previous day when his Auto Union collided with Richard Seaman during the German Grand Prix at the Nurburgring.

Ernst von Delius

Ernst von Delius

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1948

73 years ago

The 3 mile (4.85 km) track located at Blandford Camp, Dorset (England), home of the Royal Electrical & Mechanical Engineers, staged its first motor car races. Although a success, this first meeting lost the organisers money. Continue Reading →

Blandford circuit (late 1940s)

Blandford circuit (late 1940s)

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1952

69 years ago

Hubert K Dalton (86), one of the designers of the original Chevrolet car in 1911 and later a manufacturer of automotive tools, died in Honolulu, Hawaii.

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1955

66 years ago

Lancia quit racing and gave all their racing cars and equipment to Ferrari.

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1963

58 years ago

A new 50 mph speed limit was introduced in Great Britain for all roads, except motorways, for the five weekends of the peak holiday season from 26 July to 25 August. It was ignored by most drivers.

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1964

57 years ago

Francis Richard Henry Penn Curzon (80) racer for Sunbeam and Talbot in the 1920s and later a Member of Parliament, died in Buckinghamshire, England. Curzon, better known as Lord Howe, made his race debut at the comparatively old age of 44, in the 1928 Irish TT with a Bugatti Type 43. After leaving the House of Commons he pursued his driving career with increasing vigour. Continue Reading →

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1969

52 years ago

Racer Leon Dernier (57) was killed when his Mazda R100 crashed during a race in Spa-Francorchamps, Belgium.

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1976

45 years ago

George Sounders (73), winner of the 1927 Indianapolis 500, died. He led the last 51 laps of the 1927 race after starting in 22nd position as a race rookie.

George Sounders

George Sounders

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1976

45 years ago

Lee Kunzman, John Martin, Roger McCluskey, Dick Simon, and George Snyder tested the new pavement at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway with a 10-lap "race" during the Governors Conference. Indiana Governor Otis Bowen declared the race a tie.

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1986

35 years ago

The Lockington rail crash occurred at Lockington, Humberside (now in the East Riding of Yorkshire), England, when the 09:33 passenger train from Bridlington to Hull on the Yorkshire Coast Line hit a Ford Escort van on a level crossing. Eight passengers on the train, and a boy of 11 in the van, lost their lives.

Lockington rail crash

Lockington rail crash

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1987

34 years ago

Bill Elliott stormed to victory from the pole position to win the Talladega 500 at Talladega (Alabama, US) Superspeedway, marking the last race at the 2.66-mile track without carburetor restrictor plates. Elliott topped qualifying with a speed of 203. Continue Reading →

1987 Talladega 500

1987 Talladega 500

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1987

34 years ago

The German Grand Prix at Hockenheim was won by eventual 1987 World Champion, Nelson Piquet driving a Williams FW11B. It was his first win of the season and his third win in the German Grand Prix having previously won for Brabham in 1981, and Williams in the previous year. Piquet won by over a minute and a half from Swedish driver Stefan Johansson driving a McLaren MP4/3, who coasted over the finish line on three wheels due to a tyre puncture suffered just past the pits on his last lap. Continue Reading →

Nelson Piquet - 1987 German Grand Prix

Nelson Piquet - 1987 German Grand Prix

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1992

29 years ago

Contested over 45 laps of Hockenheim, the German Grand Prix was won by Williams driver (and polesitter) Nigel Mansell. Ayrton Senna finished the race in second place for the McLaren team whilst Michael Schumacher took the final podium spot in his Benetton. Ayrton Senna dropped out of title contention at this race, although it seemed inevitable that only Mansell would be Driver's Champion anyway - he clinched the title at the next race in Hungary.

Start of the 1992 German Grand Prix

Start of the 1992 German Grand Prix

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1998

23 years ago

The U.S. 500, the most prestigious race in the Championship Auto Racing Teams (CART) series turned to tragedy when a wheel from Adrian Fernandez's car flew into the grandstands during a crash on lap 175 of the 250 lap race, killing three fans and wounding six others at Michigan Speedway in Brooklyn, Michigan.

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1998

23 years ago

A mixed-up grid resulted from a wet/dry qualifying session, with Giancarlo Fisichella taking his first pole position at the Austrian Grand Prix at the A1-Ring. Mika Häkkinen won the race. Coulthard was a lap down on lap 2 having been involved in two collisions but finished 2nd just behind his team mate.

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2003

18 years ago

Vauxhall/Opel began a 24-hour run of the ECO-Speedster concept car, powered with the new 1.3 CDTi diesel engine. This run, to mark the beginning of a major diesel-engine offensive for Vauxhall/Opel, established 17 new world records. The concept car averaged 141 mph over the 24 hours, recorded a top speed of 160.2 mph and reported a best fuel consumption of 111.2 mpg.

Opel ECO Speedster

Opel ECO Speedster

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2005

16 years ago

The Lexus (Luxury Edition for the United States) marque was introduced to the Japanese market, becoming the first Japanese premium car marque to launch in its country of origin

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2006

15 years ago

Popular broadcaster and ­former NASCAR champion Benny Parsons began treatments for lung cancer. Parsons would succumb to the disease less than six months later on January 16, 2007. He was 65.

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2009

12 years ago

Jaime Alguersuari (Spain, b.23 March 1990) aged 19 years 125 days became the youngest driver to finish a Formula One World Championship race when he finished the Hungarian Grand Prix in Budapest, Hungary. Jamie was racing for Toro Rosso - he finished 15th in the race.

Jaime Alguersuari

Jaime Alguersuari

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2009

12 years ago

AC/DC singer Brian Johnson appeared as the Star in a Reasonably Priced Car on the BBC television programme Top Gear. His time of 1:45.9 tied him with Simon Cowell for the second fastest time. He was introduced by host Jeremy Clarkson as "a man who has sold more albums than The Beatles, and I bet almost none of [the audience] have ever heard of him."

Brian Johnson

Brian Johnson

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2010

11 years ago

China’s Geely Holding Group received final government approval to acquire Volvo Cars from Ford Motor Co. in a $1.8 billion deal.

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2011

10 years ago

A 1948 Tucker sedan was featured in NBC's It's Worth What? television show. The car's estimated value at that time was US$1,200,000. The car is commonly referred to as the "Tucker Torpedo". Continue Reading →

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2013

8 years ago

The last vehicle was produced at Ford's Southampton motor vehicle assembly plant, ending Ford's 100 plus year vehicle assembly history in the UK.

The final transit van rolls of production line in Southampton

The final transit van rolls of production line in Southampton

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2017

4 years ago

It was reported that Britain would ban the sale of new petrol and diesel cars from 2040 in an attempt to reduce air pollution that could herald the end of over a century of reliance on the internal combustion engine.

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